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Subaru Grille Guards

Subaru Model

Many accidents hit the road everyday, which do not only hurt lives, but also leave the vehicles dilapidated. If air bags are for people, then grille guard is for the cars or trucks. The majority of Subaru Grill Guards are made with stainless steel tubing, so they are light and they look great. Stainless steel is also great because it will stand up to the test of time and generally will not rust and is very resistant. Chrome grille guards are like a crown in many ways. They are a sign of royalty, they cover the head of your Subaru, they are powerful, and they let the masses know that you mean business. If you take your truck out on the trail, then grille guards may also be called brush guards or bull bar.

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These are several names for the same purpose. Whether you drive in the woods or the highway, the most important thing is that you get a quality Bull Bars made out of chrome. Protecting your truck with quality parts will help you achieve the goal of duration and it will make your truck a unique king of the road for many years to come. When you're in the market for a truck grille guard, there are a few things to bear in mind. The first is that you should only purchase grille guards that are designed to fit your Subaru model. This eliminates the need for drilling new holes in the underside of the vehicle and provides a perfect fit for your new push bar. The second thing that you need to look for is a complete package, if you want your Subaru Grill Guards with all the options, including a skid plate as it provides protection below the engine, as well as in front of the truck.

About SUBARU

Subaru began making even more noise come the '90s, taking home the prize at the World Rally Championship three consecutive years (95, 96, and 97). The SVX rolled off the line in 1991 and received favorable reviews as another Subaru model with a penchant for performance. The Impreza followed up and impressed with the turbocharged WRX, which would later go on to become a favorite for tuners and auto enthusiasts. But overall Subaru sales were beginning to slump as the industry started embracing sport utility vehicles. Injecting a boost into the brand was the Outback, which premiered in 1995 as Subaru's first entrant into the burgeoning crossover SUV segment. The Forester and the Tribeca, two crossover SUVs, have also helped Subaru flourish in recent years. With a roster that now includes a variety of fashionable and reliable models known for delivering a fun ride, Subaru remains a force to be reckoned with.

By the 1970s, Subaru had added the Leone, Rex, and Brat to its lineup. The Leone started off as a front-wheel drive coupe but was soon available as a sedan, wagon, and even a pickup. What made the Leone stand out even more was its four-wheel drive capability, which was at the time especially unusual for a sedan or wagon. Subaru had established a reputation for presenting vehicles and Subaru parts that were seen as both "quirky" and flexible, and the automaker kept the ball rolling come the '80s. But as the '90s approached, the Legacy made its way onto the pavement. The Subaru Legacy was a departure from older Subaru models, as it was a midsize car that provided a kick in performance. It also differed from other cars in its class due to its standard all-wheel drive and new flat-four engine configuration.

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Subaru is known for producing automobiles and auto parts that deliver a mixture of economy and sport with a friendly price tag mixed in. Founded in the early 1950s, Subaru introduced its first model in 1954, the four-cylinder P-1. The P-1 is a notable vehicle because it also the first Japanese vehicle to have a monocoque body, which integrates the body and chassis together. Four years later, Subaru premiered the compact 360. Referred to as the "ladybug", the Subaru 360 used a small air-cooled inline 2-cylinder engine and brought popularity to the marque, staying in production for over a decade. In 1961, Subaru unveiled the Sambar, a compact truck that served the narrow Japanese streets well. A Sambar van followed closely behind. The rest of the '60s saw other models such as the 1000 and the R2, a city car, make their arrival. Subaru North America was created in 1968, clearing the way for Subaru models to make their way into US showrooms.