info@skippystalin.com
262-721-7004

Select your vehicle

Get News

Buick Grille Guards

Buick Model

Many accidents hit the road everyday, which do not only hurt lives, but also leave the vehicles dilapidated. If air bags are for people, then grille guard is for the cars or trucks. The majority of Buick Grill Guards are made with stainless steel tubing, so they are light and they look great. Stainless steel is also great because it will stand up to the test of time and generally will not rust and is very resistant. Chrome grille guards are like a crown in many ways. They are a sign of royalty, they cover the head of your Buick, they are powerful, and they let the masses know that you mean business. If you take your truck out on the trail, then grille guards may also be called brush guards or bull bar.

BUICK image 1

These are several names for the same purpose. Whether you drive in the woods or the highway, the most important thing is that you get a quality Bull Bars made out of chrome. Protecting your truck with quality parts will help you achieve the goal of duration and it will make your truck a unique king of the road for many years to come. When you're in the market for a truck grille guard, there are a few things to bear in mind. The first is that you should only purchase grille guards that are designed to fit your Buick model. This eliminates the need for drilling new holes in the underside of the vehicle and provides a perfect fit for your new push bar. The second thing that you need to look for is a complete package, if you want your Buick Grill Guards with all the options, including a skid plate as it provides protection below the engine, as well as in front of the truck.

About BUICK

As the '80s settled in, Buick's lineup consisted of holdovers such as the Regal and Electra along with new vehicles including the Grand National and GNX. Sales climbed and then fell towards the latter part of the decade. Buick was starting to see increasing competition from foreign brands like Lexus and BMW. In 2001, Buick received a big lift thanks to the Rendezvous, the marque's first SUV. The crossover Rendezvous did its job, just about instantly reinvigorating Buick's sales in the process. However, by 2005, there was talk of GM looking into eliminating Buick altogether to save money. Instead, the brand rebounded once again with the LaCrosse, a combination of the Century and the Regal. The Buick Lucerne, a full-size luxury car, replaced both the LeSabre and Park Avenue. Buick's plan was to improve on previous models through consolidation. The plan worked. The Enclave rolled off the line 2007 for the 2008 model year and was a hit right from the start. Currently, Buick offers a small lineup of vehicles directed at providing luxury and comfort while appealing to a more youthful demographic than ever before.

World War II put a pause on Buick's production, but following the war the company got back on track. In 1948, Buick introduced Dynaflow, the company's first automatic transmission. The 1950s would also see the arrival of the Skylark, a convertible sedan with V8 power and a 12 volt electrical system. Despite the Skylark's presence, the second half of the '50s saw Buick hit a slump and sales dropped. But in 1959, Buick started to rebound. The Roadmaster was renamed the Electra and also restyled. That same year, the Buick LeSabre debuted, giving the brand two strong models to open up the next decade. Sales had been erratic on and off since the war, but thanks to models like the Riviera, Gran Sport, and Regal, Buick managed to enjoy steady success throughout the '60s. The 1970s bought on the oil crisis, with drivers from coast to coast turning their backs on powerful gas-guzzling sleds in favor of smaller, more economical sedans. Buick tried to adapt accordingly by developing cars that fit the times more appropriately.

BUICK image 1

Buick has been around for over a 100 years, providing drivers with a solid combination of luxury and dependability. Founded by David Dunbar Buick in 1903, the first Buick car to be completed was the two-cylinder Model B a year later. 1907 saw the arrival of the first Buick to boast a four-cylinder engine, the Model D. William C. Durant purchased the Buick Motor Company soon after to become part of General Motors. Throughout the next decade, Buick cars and these auto parts began to establish their own identity. Buick models began being assembled with six-cylinder engines and by the roaring '20s, four-wheel disc brakes were standard on most of the lineup, making Buick the first automaker to offer them on a wide scale. The 1930s saw Buick begin to develop cars with 8-cylinder engines and also introduce the first rear-flashing turn signal. 1936 ushered in the Roadmaster, one of Buick's most celebrated models. Available as a sedan, coupe, station wagon, and convertible, the Roadmaster would go on to become one of the brand's most important models and help solidify the roster throughout the next two decades.